Between dreams and reality exist whole dimensions.

More Mead!

 I had some free time and birthday money on Sunday, so I decided to brew up some more mead. This was an ambitious and experimental brewing for me. I’ve brewed 2 previous batches of mead, as you may recall. The first batch had a low honey/water ratio and a Champagne Yeast, and came out strong and very, very dry. The second I used a slightly higher honey/water ratio and an ale yeast; which came out slightly stronger than beer with a sweet, rich flavor. Both times I used local Wildflower Honey bought in bulk (5lbs jugs). This time I actually made 3 different batches.

I made a 1 gallon batch using local Clover Honey and the Ale yeast. This should come out pretty sweet, and I am very interested to taste test it against the Wildflower Honey batch, as I used the same yeast and approximately the same honey/water ratio.  The 2nd batch I made using the Champagne Yeast and  Wildflower Honey at about a double honey/water ratio of the Christmas batch (about 6lbs per gallon). My hope is for a strong, sweet mead; one that’s closer to the alcohol content of strong wine, but with a gentler flavor than the Christmas batch. Again, this was a simple mead (or Show Mead as plain honey meads are called now days), no spices or other additions.

                             It takes a lot of stuff to brew properly.

 The last batch I made is the most interesting. I used a mix of the 2 musts (though heavier on the Wildflower Honey) and re-brewed them with dried Elderberry and Cloves. Elderberry is an interesting fruit: it has a long held tradition in Europe as a healing plant, especially useful for respitory infections, and is often brewed into a wine with grapes and cloves. Elderberry cannot be eaten raw though, and must be cooked thoroughly otherwise it is actually poisoness. So I was sure to let the batch boil extra long before cooling. It has a very pleasent scent, fruity sweet from the Elderberry and honey, spicey from the Cloves. I’m using the Champagne Yeast, so it should come out pretty strong. I’ve decided to call it my Rainy-Day Melotheglin, and I can’t wait to try it when it finishes fermenting.

The dark one on the left is the Rainy-Day Melotheglin, the middle batch is the Wildflower strong batch, and the lighter one on the right is the Clover sweet batch. Mmmmmmmmmmm!

 

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3 responses

  1. Pingback: Bottled our First Batch of Elderflower Mead Summer English Sparkling Wine « Gold Within

  2. Your mother smells of elderberries!!! Haha – just couldn’t resist.

    May 31, 2012 at 07:19

  3. Pingback: A bottle a day, until next May « Gold Within

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